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Barbrina Dunmire

Senior Engineer

Email

mrbean@apl.washington.edu

Phone

206-685-6953

Education

B.S. Aeronautics & Astronautics, University of Washington, 1989

M.S. Aeronautics & Astronautics, University of Washington, 1991

M.S. Bioengineering, University of Washington, 1998

Videos

SonoMotion: A Budding Start-up Company

A research team has developed new technologies to treat kidney stone disease with an ultrasound-based system. Embraced by clinicians, their advances are now being taken to the next step: transition the prototype to an approved device that will roll into hospitals and clinics around the world.

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11 Feb 2013

At the Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound a team of scientists, engineers, and students has developed an ultrasound-based system that may provide an office procedure to speed the natural passage of kidney stones. The system uses commercial ultrasound components to locate stones in kidneys. It creates clear pictures of them and then applies an acoustic radiative force, repositioning stones in the kidney so they are more likely to pass naturally.

As a research team, considerable technical advancements have been made and valuable feedback and cooperation has been garnered from the user community – the clinicians. The scientists, engineers, urologists, and commercialization experts are now collaborating to take the next steps.

SonoMotion has partnered with a hardware manufacturing company and licensed the ultrasonic propulsion of kidney stones technology with the University of Washington. The next big step will be to transition the prototype system into one that will pass the rigors of FDA review and be ready to roll into hospitals and clinics around the world.

Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound - CIMU

CIMU is a group of scientists, engineers, and technicians dedicated to research across the field of bio-medical ultrasonics with the goal of developing technologies that will be used in a clinic to treat patients.

1 Nov 2010

Publications

2000-present and while at APL-UW

Ultrasound-induced bubble clusters in tissue-mimicking agar phantoms

Movahed, P., W. Kreider, A.D. Maxwell, B. Dunmire, and J.B. Freund, "Ultrasound-induced bubble clusters in tissue-mimicking agar phantoms," Ultrasound Med. Biol., 43, 2318-2328, doi:10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2017.06.013, 2017.

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1 Oct 2017

Therapeutic ultrasound can drive bubble activity that damages soft tissues. To study the potential mechanisms of such injury, transparent agar tissue-mimicking phantoms were subjected to multiple pressure wave bursts of the kind being considered specifically for burst wave lithotripsy. A high-speed camera recorded bubble activity during each pulse. Various agar concentrations were used to alter the phantom's mechanical properties, especially its stiffness, which was varied by a factor of 3.5. However, the maximum observed bubble radius was insensitive to stiffness. During 1000 wave bursts of a candidate burst wave lithotripsy treatment, bubbles appeared continuously in a region that expanded slowly, primarily toward the transducer. Denser bubble clouds are formed at higher pulse repetition frequency. The specific observations are used to inform the incorporation of damage mechanisms into cavitation models for soft materials.

Safety and effectiveness of a longer focal beam and burst duration in ultrasonic propulsion for repositioning urinary stones and fragments

Janssen, K.M., T.C. Brand, B.W. Cunitz, Y.-N. Wang, J.C. Simon, F. Starr, H.D. Liggitt, J. Thiel, M.D. Sorensen, J.D. Harper, M.R. Bailey, and B. Dunmire, "Safety and effectiveness of a longer focal beam and burst duration in ultrasonic propulsion for repositioning urinary stones and fragments," J. Endourol., 31, 793-799, doi:10.1089/end.2017.0167, 2017.

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1 Aug 2017

Purpose: In the first-in-human trial of ultrasonic propulsion, subjects passed collections of residual stone fragments repositioned with a C5-2 probe. Here, effectiveness and safety in moving multiple fragments are compared between the C5-2 and a custom (SC-50) probe that produces a longer focal beam and burst duration.

Materials and Methods: Effectiveness was quantified by the number of stones expelled from a calyx phantom consisting of a 30-mm deep, water-filled well in a block of tissue mimicking material. Each probe was positioned below the phantom to move stones against gravity. Single propulsion bursts of 50 ms or 3 s duration were applied to three separate targets: 10 fragments of 2 different sizes (1–2 and 2–3 mm) and a single 4 x 7 mm human stone. Safety studies consisted of porcine kidneys exposed to an extreme dose of 10-minute burst duration, including a 7-day survival study and acute studies with surgically implanted stones.

Results: Although successful in the clinical trial, the shorter focal beam and maximum 50 ms burst duration of the C5-2 probe moved stones, but did not expel any stones from the phantom's 30-mm deep calyx. The results were similar with the SC-50 probe under the same 50 ms burst duration. Longer (3 s) bursts available with the SC-50 probe expelled all stones at both 4.5 and 9.5 cm "skin-to-stone" depths with lower probe heating compared to the C5-2. No abnormal behavior, urine chemistry, serum chemistry, or histological findings were observed within the kidney or surrounding tissues for the 10 min burst duration used in the animal studies.

Conclusions: A longer focal beam and burst duration improved expulsion of a stone and multiple stone fragments from a phantom over a broad range of clinically relevant penetration depths and did not cause kidney injury in animal studies.

Developing complete ultrasonic management of kidney stones for spaceflight

Simon, J.C., B. Dunmire, M.D. Sorensen, and M.R. Bailey, "Developing complete ultrasonic management of kidney stones for spaceflight," J. Space Safety Eng., 3, 50-57, 2016.

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1 Sep 2016

Bone demineralization, dehydration, and stasis put astronauts at an increased risk of forming kidney stones in space. The incidence of kidney stones and the potential for a mission-critical event are expected to rise as expeditions become longer and immediate transport to Earth becomes more problematic. At the University of Washington, we are developing an ultrasound-based stone management system to detect stones with S-modeTM ultrasound imaging, break stones with burst wave lithotripsy (BWLTM), and reposition stones with ultrasonic propulsion (UPTM) on Earth and in space. This review discusses the development and current state of these technologies, as well as integration on the flexible ultrasound system sponsored by NASA and the National Space Biomedical Research Institute.

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Inventions

Supplemental Know How for Pushing, Imaging, and Breaking Kidney Stones

Record of Invention Number: 47878

Mike Bailey, Larry Crum, Bryan Cunitz, Barbrina Dunmire, Vera Khokhlova, Wayne Kreider, John Kucewicz, Dan Leotta

Disclosure

9 Nov 2016

Ultrasound based method and apparatus for stone detection and to facilitate clearance thereof

Patent Number: 9,204,859

Mike Bailey, Bryan Cunitz, Barbrina Dunmire, John Kucewicz, Oleg Sapozhnikov

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Patent

8 Dec 2015

Described herein are methods and apparatus for detecting stones by ultrasound, in which the ultrasound reflections from a stone are preferentially selected and accentuated relative to the ultrasound reflections from blood or tissue. Also described herein are methods and apparatus for applying pushing ultrasound to in vivo stones or other objects, to facilitate the removal of such in vivo objects.

Novel Probe and Workflow for Ultrasonic Propulsion

Record of Invention Number: 47322

Mike Bailey, Bryan Cunitz, Brian Dickinson, Barbrina Dunmire, Brian MacConaghy, Adam Maxwell

Disclosure

1 May 2015

More Inventions

Acoustics Air-Sea Interaction & Remote Sensing Center for Environmental & Information Systems Center for Industrial & Medical Ultrasound Electronic & Photonic Systems Ocean Engineering Ocean Physics Polar Science Center
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