APL Home
APL-UW Home

Jobs About Campus Map Contact Intranet

Kate Stafford

Principal Oceanographer

Affiliate Associate Professor, Oceanography

Email

stafford@apl.washington.edu

Phone

206-685-8617

Department Affiliation

Acoustics

Publications

2000-present and while at APL-UW

A new song recorded from blue whales in the Corcovado Gulf, Southern Chile, and an acoustic link to the Eastern Tropical Pacific

Buchan, S.J., R. Hucke-Gaete, L. Rendell, and K.M. Stafford, "A new song recorded from blue whales in the Corcovado Gulf, Southern Chile, and an acoustic link to the Eastern Tropical Pacific," Endang. Species Res., 23, 241-252, doi:10.3354/esr00566, 2014.

More Info

24 Mar 2014

The identity, distribution and movements of blue whales Balaenoptera musculus that forage in the Chiloense Ecoregion in Southern Chile remain unclear. Studies of blue whale songs have identified acoustic populations with distinct song types, geographic ranges, migration routes and seasonal residencies%u2014information that is relevant to the conservation of this endangered species. Here, we characterized the song sequences of blue whales that use the Corcovado Gulf based on dipping hydrophone recordings from 3 austral summer field seasons (2008, 2009, 2011), and compare these data to previously described song types for the Southeast Pacific (SEP) in order to better understand meso-scale (versus basin-scale) variation in blue whale song. Two distinct songs, SEP1 and SEP2, emerged from our analysis. Neither of these songs is used by Antarctic blue whales. Although SEP1 was the first song recorded in the Corcovado Gulf area in 1970, we found SEP2 to be the more common song, despite never having been reported previously in this area. Our report of SEP2 adds a new song to the current description of the SEP blue whale repertoire. Our recording of SEP1 reaffirms the acoustic link already established between Chile and the Eastern Tropical Pacific (ETP); our recording of SEP2 establishes a new acoustic link for this song between Chile and the ETP. These findings provide the basis for future passive acoustic studies on the temporal and spatial distributions of endangered SEP blue whales and for understanding how these songs relate to the population structure.

Sounds in the ocean at 1–100 Hz

Wilcock, W.S.D., K.M. Stafford, R.K. Andrew, and R.I. Odom, "Sounds in the ocean at 1–100 Hz," Ann. Rev. Mar. Sci., 6 117-140, doi:10.1146/annurev-marine-121211-172423, 2014.

More Info

1 Jan 2014

Very-low-frequency sounds between 1 and 100 Hz propagate large distances in the ocean sound channel. Weather conditions, earthquakes, marine mammals, and anthropogenic activities influence sound levels in this band. Weather-related sounds result from interactions between waves, bubbles entrained by breaking waves, and the deformation of sea ice. Earthquakes generate sound in geologically active regions, and earthquake T waves propagate throughout the oceans. Blue and fin whales generate long bouts of sounds near 20 Hz that can dominate regional ambient noise levels seasonally. Anthropogenic sound sources include ship propellers, energy extraction, and seismic air guns and have been growing steadily. The increasing availability of long-term records of ocean sound will provide new opportunities for a deeper understanding of natural and anthropogenic sound sources and potential interactions between them.

Subarctic cetaceans in the southern Chukchi Sea: Evidence of recovery or response to a changing ecosystem

Clarke, J., K. Stafford, S.E. Moore, B. Rone, L. Aerts, and J. Crance, "Subarctic cetaceans in the southern Chukchi Sea: Evidence of recovery or response to a changing ecosystem," Oeanography, 26, 136-149, doi:10.5670/oceanog.2013.81, 2013.

More Info

1 Dec 2013

The southern Chukchi Sea is one of the most productive areas in the world ocean. Over the past decade, there have been dramatic changes in this region in sea ice cover and in Bering Strait inflow, and it is now in the path of transpolar shipping and destinational ship traffic, including vessels supporting Arctic offshore oil and gas development and tourism, all of which are anticipated to increase with decreasing seasonal sea ice cover. Little research on cetaceans has been conducted in the southern Chukchi Sea, and most information on the occurrence of subarctic species (humpback whale Megaptera novaeangliae, fin whale Balaenoptera physalus, minke whale B. acutorostrata, and killer whale Orcinus orca) comes from the ships' logs of commercial whalers in the mid to late twentieth century and from observers stationed along the Chukotka Peninsula. Information on cetacean seasonal occurrence east of the International Date Line (IDL) in US waters is particularly scarce.

To address this information gap, we compiled visual sightings and acoustic detections of subarctic cetaceans in the southern Chukchi Sea during summer and early autumn from 2009 to 2012. Humpback whales were common on both sides of the IDL in August and September. Fin and minke whales were widely distributed east of the IDL from July to September, and killer whales were seen sporadically but were the most widely dispersed of the four species. Comparisons of our results with historical records indicate that the incidence of subarctic cetaceans may be increasing in the southern Chukchi Sea. An increase in occurrence may simply be a post-commercial whaling recovery of whale numbers and seasonal range by each species, or it may reflect responses to ongoing climate change. Understanding current stock identity, spatial and temporal distribution, habitat preference, relative abundance, and potential impacts of climate change on these species will require cetacean-focused research in this region of the Arctic.

More Publications

Seasonal and geographic variation of southern blue whale subspecies in the Indian Ocean

Samaran, F., K.M. Stafford, T.A. Branch, J. Gedamke, J.-Y. Royer, R.P. Dziak, and C. Guinet, "Seasonal and geographic variation of southern blue whale subspecies in the Indian Ocean," Plos One, 8, e71561, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0071561, 2013.

More Info

13 Aug 2013

Understanding the seasonal movements and distribution patterns of migratory species over ocean basin scales is vital for appropriate conservation and management measures. However, assessing populations over remote regions is challenging, particularly if they are rare. Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus spp) are an endangered species found in the Southern and Indian Oceans. Here two recognized subspecies of blue whales and, based on passive acoustic monitoring, four "acoustic populations" occur. Three of these are pygmy blue whale (B.m. brevicauda) populations while the fourth is the Antarctic blue whale (B.m. intermedia). Past whaling catches have dramatically reduced their numbers but recent acoustic recordings show that these oceans are still important habitat for blue whales. Presently little is known about the seasonal movements and degree of overlap of these four populations, particularly in the central Indian Ocean. We examined the geographic and seasonal occurrence of different blue whale acoustic populations using one year of passive acoustic recording from three sites located at different latitudes in the Indian Ocean. The vocalizations of the different blue whale subspecies and acoustic populations were recorded seasonally in different regions. For some call types and locations, there was spatial and temporal overlap, particularly between Antarctic and different pygmy blue whale acoustic populations. Except on the southernmost hydrophone, all three pygmy blue whale acoustic populations were found at different sites or during different seasons, which further suggests that these populations are generally geographically distinct. This unusual blue whale diversity in sub-Antarctic and sub-tropical waters indicates the importance of the area for blue whales in these former whaling grounds.

Year-round acoustic detection of bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus) in the Beaufort Sea relative to changing environmental conditions, 2008–2010

MacIntyre, K.Q., K.M. Stafford, C.L. Berchok, and P.L. Boveng, "Year-round acoustic detection of bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus) in the Beaufort Sea relative to changing environmental conditions, 2008–2010," Polar Biol., 36, 1161-1173, doi:10.1007/s00300-013-1337-1, 2013.

More Info

1 May 2013

Bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus) are pan-Arctic pinnipeds that are often seen in association with pack ice, and are known for their long, loud trills, produced underwater primarily in the spring. Acoustic recordings were collected from August 2008 to August 2010 at two locations and a single year (2008–2009) at a third location, in the western Beaufort Sea. Three recorders in 2008–2009 had a 30% duty cycle and a bandwidth of 10–4,096 Hz. One recorder in 2009–2010 had a 45% duty cycle and a bandwidth of 10–4,096 Hz and the second had a 20% duty cycle and bandwidth of 10–8,192 Hz. Spectrograms of acoustic data were examined for characteristic patterns of bearded seal vocalizations. For each recorder, the number of hours per day with vocalizations was compared with in situ water temperature and satellite-derived daily sea ice concentrations. At all sites, bearded seals were vocally active year-round. Call activity escalated with the formation of pack ice in the winter and the peak occurred in the spring, coinciding with mating season and preceding breakup of the sea ice. There was a change in the timing of seasonal sea ice formation and retreat between the two consecutive years that was reflected in the timing of peak bearded seal call activity. This study provides new information on fall and winter bearded seal vocal behavior and the relationship between year-round vocal activity and changes in annual sea ice coverage and in situ water temperature.

Monitoring white whales (Delphinapterus leucas) with echolocation loggers

Castellote, M., R.H. Leeney, G. O'Corry-Crowe, R. Lauhakangas, K.M. Kovacs, W. Lucey, V. Krasnova, C. Lydersen, K.M. Stafford, and R. Belikov, "Monitoring white whales (Delphinapterus leucas) with echolocation loggers," Polar Biol., 36, 493-509, doi:10.1007/s00300-012-1276-2, 2013.

More Info

1 Apr 2013

Monitoring programmes for white whales (Delphinapterus leucas) have been called for repeatedly in recent years because this species is likely to be negatively impacted by climate change, but also because such a broadly dispersed, high trophic feeder can serve as an effective ecosystem sentinel. Arctic ecosystems are difficult to monitor because of the extensive winter ice coverage and extreme environmental conditions in addition to low human population densities. However, passive acoustic monitoring has proved to be a reliable method to remotely survey the presence of some marine mammals in the Arctic. In this study, we evaluate the potential use of echolocation loggers (T-POD and C-POD, Chelonia Ltd.) for remote monitoring of white whales. Captive experiments and open water surveys in three arctic/subarctic habitats (ice-noise-dominated environment, ice-free environment and low-turbidity waters) were used to document detection performance and to explore the use of logger angle and inter-click interval data to look at activity patterns and tidal influences on space use. When acoustic results were compared to concurrent visual observations, echolocation detection was only attributed to periods of white whale presence near the recorder deployment sites. Both T-PODs and C-PODs effectively detected echolocation, even under noisy ice. Diel and tidal behavioural patterns were identified. Acoustically identified movement patterns between sites were visually confirmed. This study demonstrates the feasibility of monitoring white whales using echolocation loggers and describes some important features of their behaviour as examples of the potential application of this passive acoustic monitoring method in Arctic and subarctic regions.

Correlation of a strong Alaska Coastal Current with the presence of beluga whales Delphinapterus leucas near Barrow, Alaska

Stafford, K.M., S.R. Okkonen, and J.T. Clarke, "Correlation of a strong Alaska Coastal Current with the presence of beluga whales Delphinapterus leucas near Barrow, Alaska," Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser., 474, 287-297, doi:10.3354/meps10076, 2013.

More Info

31 Jan 2013

Oceanographic features and physical processes in the ocean can create regions where prey, and therefore predators, may accumulate. Beluga whales Delphinapterus leucas are the most numerous cetacean in the Arctic. In the Alaskan Beaufort Sea, they prefer continental slope habitat in summer and autumn, presumably because such areas provide enhanced foraging opportunities. Passive acoustic detections of beluga whale calls, current velocity measurements, historical wind records, and 29 yr of beluga whale observations from aerial surveys were used to explore the hypothesis that the foraging success of beluga whales in Barrow Canyon and along the western Beaufort Sea slope is enhanced when the Alaska Coastal Current (ACC) is well-developed and flows east-northeastward and is diminished when the flow of the ACC and its shelf break extension are reversed. Aerial sightings of beluga whales, average observed beluga whale group size, and hours with whale vocalizations were more common when the ACC was well-developed and flowed east-northeastward. When the ACC flow is strong, it is separated from Arctic basin waters by a well-defined front that promotes aggregation of prey species. We speculate that the greater numbers of animals per group sighted and hours with recorded vocalizations may be indicative of enhanced foraging opportunities for beluga whales.

Spitsbergen's endangered bowhead whales sing through the polar night

Stafford, K.M., S.E. Moore, C.L. Berchok, Ø Wiig, C. Lydersen, E. Hansen, D. Kalmbach, and K.M. Kovacs, "Spitsbergen's endangered bowhead whales sing through the polar night," Endang. Species Res., 18, 95-103, doi:10.3354/esr00444, 2012.

More Info

31 Jul 2012

Bowhead whales Balaena mysticetus are long-lived cetaceans, uniquely adapted among the baleen whales to live year-round in the Arctic. All bowhead whale populations were greatly reduced by commercial whaling from the 1600s through the 1800s, with the largest, the Spitsbergen population in the North Atlantic, depleted to the point of extinction. Recent sightings of bowhead whales west of Svalbard precipitated an effort to listen for their vocalizations via 2 recorders deployed in 2008 on oceanographic moorings spaced 95 km apart at 78.8° N latitude in the Fram Strait. Year-round acoustic records were examined for the occurrence of bowhead whale sounds. Simple calls, call sequences, and complex songs were recorded. Repeated call sequences or bowhead whale songs were detected nearly every hour from early November 2008 through late April 2009 on the western Fram Strait recorder. More than 60 unique songs were recorded from October 2008 to April 2009. In contrast, simple calls and call sequences were the most common signals recorded on the central Fram Strait instrument. Peak levels of song production coincided with the period of lowest water temperature, dense ice concentration, and almost complete darkness. Given the diversity, loudness, and period over which songs were recorded, western Fram Strait appears to be a wintering ground — and potentially a mating area — for this critically endangered population of bowhead whales.

First acoustic recordings of narwhals (Monodon monoceros) in winter

Stafford, K.M., K.L. Laidre and M.P. Heide-Jørgensen, "First acoustic recordings of narwhals (Monodon monoceros) in winter," Mar. Mammal Sci., 28, E197-E207, doi:10.1111/j.1748-7692.2011.00500.x, 2012.

1 Apr 2012

Comparing marine mammal acoustic habitats in Atlantic and Pacific sectors of the High Arctic: year-long records from Fram Strait and the Chukchi Plateau

Moore, S.E., K.M. Stafford, H. Melling, C. Berchok, Ø. Wiig, K.M. Kovacs, C. Lydersen, and J.Richter-Menge, "Comparing marine mammal acoustic habitats in Atlantic and Pacific sectors of the High Arctic: year-long records from Fram Strait and the Chukchi Plateau," Polar Biol., 35, 475-480, doi: 10.1007/s00300-011-1086-y, 2012.

More Info

1 Mar 2012

During the International Polar Year (IPY), acoustic recorders were deployed on oceanographic moorings in Fram Strait and on the Chukchi Plateau, representing the first coordinated year-round sampling of underwater acoustic habitats at two sites in the High Arctic. Examination of species-specific marine mammal calls recorded from autumn 2008–2009 revealed distinctly different acoustic habitats at each site. Overall, the Fram Strait site was acoustically complex compared with the Chukchi Plateau site.

In Fram Strait, calls from bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus) and a variety of toothed whales (odontocetes) were recorded year-round, as were airgun pulses from seismic surveys. In addition, calls from blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin whales (B. physalus) were recorded from June to October and August to March, respectively. Conversely, at the Chukchi Plateau site, beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) and bowhead whale calls were recorded primarily from May to August, with airgun signals detected only in September–October. Ribbon seal (Phoca fasciata) calls were detected in October–November, with no marine mammals calls at all recorded from December to February. Of note, ice-adapted bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus) were recorded at both sites, primarily in spring and summer, corresponding with the mating season for that species.

Differences in acoustic habitats between the two sites were related to contrasts in sea ice cover, temperature, patterns of ocean circulation and contributions from anthropogenic noise sources. These data provide a provisional baseline for the comparison of underwater acoustic habitats between Pacific and Atlantic sectors of the High Arctic.

Seasonal detection of three types of 'pygmy' blue whale calls in the Indian Ocean

Stafford, K. M., E. Chapp, D.R. Bohnenstiel, and M. Tolstoy, "Seasonal detection of three types of 'pygmy' blue whale calls in the Indian Ocean," Mar. Mammal Sci., 27, 828-840, doi: 10.1111/j.1748-7692.2010.00437.x, 2011.

1 Oct 2011

Listening to marine mammals at basin to local scales

Moore, S.E., S.M. Van Parijs, B.L. Southall, and K.M. Stafford, "Listening to marine mammals at basin to local scales," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 129, 2371, doi:10.1121/1.3587678, 2011.

More Info

1 Apr 2011

The successful use of SOSUS to track broad-scale occurrence patterns in whale calls during the second half of the 20th century fostered the development of autonomous recorders that can be deployed virtually anywhere in the world ocean. Over the past decade, data from these recorders have provided dramatic insights to marine mammal ecology. Patterns of call reception have demonstrated the near year-round occurrence of some baleen whale species in Arctic and Antarctic waters, a discovery that challenges long-held assumptions about the phenology of seasonal migrations. Integration of year-long calling records with physical oceanographic measures at mooring-based ocean observatories provides a means to include large whales in ecosystem-based models. The reception of anthropogenic sounds on nearly all recorders, whether deployed in coastal or remote areas, emphasizes the need to develop regional "soundscapes" based upon integrative sampling and analytical protocols. Examples from several long-term research programs will be provided as the basis for the strong assertion that passive acoustic observation of marine mammals is a vital component of any ocean observing system. Opportunities for future collaborations and the challenges of data management and access will be discussed.

Singing behavior of fin whales in the Davis Strait with implications for mating, migration and foraging

Simon, M., K.M. Stafford, K. Beedholm, C.M. Lee, and P.T. Madsen, "Singing behavior of fin whales in the Davis Strait with implications for mating, migration and foraging," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 128, 3200-3210, doi:10.1121/1.3495946, 2010.

More Info

1 Nov 2010

Most baleen whales undertake migrations between low-latitude breeding grounds and high-latitude feeding grounds. Though little is known about the timing of their migration from the Arctic, fin whales are assumed to undertake a similar migratory pattern. To address questions about habitat use and migrations, the acoustic activity of fin whales in Davis Strait, between Greenland and Canada, was monitored continuously for two years using three bottom-moored acoustic recorders.

The acoustic power in the fin whale call frequencies peaked in November–December, showing that fin whales are present in Davis Strait much later in the year than previously expected. The closely timed peaks in song activity and conception time imply that not all fin whales migrate south to mate, but rather start mating at high latitudes rather than or before migrating. Singing activity was strongly linked to daylight hours, suggesting that fin whales might feed during the few daylight hours of the late fall and early Arctic winter. A negative correlation between the advancing sea ice front and power in fin whale frequencies indicates that future changes in sea ice conditions from global warming might change the distribution and migratory patterns of fin whales near the poles.

Including passive acoustic capability in Arctic ocean observing systems

Moore, S.E., K.M. Stafford, C.L. Berchok, H. Melling, and O. Wiig, "Including passive acoustic capability in Arctic ocean observing systems," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 127, 1756, doi:10.1121/1.3383701, 2010

More Info

20 Apr 2010

Over the past decade, long-term deployments of passive acoustic recorders have provided a new baseline on the seasonal occurrence of large whale species in remote regions of the world ocean. In the Arctic, passive acoustic sampling has identified both whale calls and sounds from anthropogenic sources (ships and seismic profiling), activities that are expected to increase with diminished sea ice cover. In 2008, NOAA capitalized on an opportunity to join on-going IPY projects by inclusion of recorders at three High Arctic mooring sites: one on the Chukchi Plateau and two on either side of Fram Strait. The recorders (AURAL–M2) provided a year of sub-sampled (9 min on/11 min off) recordings at 0.1 Hz to 4 kHz (8192 sampling rate), which encompasses the bandwidth of whale and ice seal calls. Data from the recorders were complemented by a suite of standard oceanographic measures from other instruments on the mooring line.

Provisional results show novel occurrence of both marine mammal and anthropogenic signals in the High Arctic. To realize the vision of a Global Ocean Acoustic Observing Network [Dushaw et al. (2009)], passive acoustic technology must become a standard sampling component, especially in the Arctic during this time of rapid climate change.

Where do the Chukchi Sea fin whales come from? Looking for answers in the structure of songs recorded in the Bering Sea and Western North Pacific

Delarue, J., D.K. Mellinger, K.M. Stafford, and C.L. Berchok, "Where do the Chukchi Sea fin whales come from? Looking for answers in the structure of songs recorded in the Bering Sea and Western North Pacific," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 127, 1758, 2010.

More Info

20 Apr 2010

Fin whales are common throughout the North Pacific and have recently been detected acoustically as far north as the northeastern Chukchi Sea. Non-acoustic evidence suggests that North Pacific fin whales are segregated into two populations wintering along the Asian and North American coast with at least some animals intermingling in the summer in the Bering Sea–Aleutian Islands area. Male fin whales produce regionally distinctive songs which are likely indicative of population structure. In this study we evaluated the relationship of fin whales recorded in the northeastern Chukchi (2007 and 2009) and southeastern Bering (2007–2008) seas by comparing the structure of their song. Additionally, we investigated whether fin whales detected in these areas could be part of an Asian population by comparing their songs to those recorded near the Emperor Seamounts in the western North Pacific (2007). The results will be discussed in light of the current knowledge on North Pacific fin whale population structure.

Biophysical ocean observation in the southeastern Bering Sea

Stafford, K.M., S.E. Moore, P.J. Stabeno, D.V. Holliday, J.M. Napp, D.K. Mellinger, "Biophysical ocean observation in the southeastern Bering Sea," Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, doi:10.1029/2009GL040724, 2010.

More Info

30 Jan 2010

Integrated ocean observation, from physical and atmospheric forcing mechanisms to the distribution and abundance of top-level predators, is critical to the investigation of marine ecosystems and the impact of climate change on them. We integrated data from a biophysical mooring in the southeast Bering Sea to create a one-year snapshot of ocean dynamics in this remote large marine ecosystem.

Distinct patterns in production (chlorophyll), zooplankton biovolume (copepods and euphausiids) and the occurrence of zooplankton predators (fin and right whales) were defined and related to discrete features in the annual physical cycle. Peaks in prey and predator cycles were linked to spikes in fluorescence that occurred at the onset of water column stratification in late spring 2006 and the appearance of sea ice in late winter 2007. These data illustrate the capability and potential of integrated ocean observing systems (IOOS) to describe seasonal variability and linkages in a remote marine ecosystem.

Acoustic and visual surveys for bowhead whales in the western Beaufort and far northeastern Chukchi seas

Moore, S.E., K.M. Stafford, and L.M. Munger, "Acoustic and visual surveys for bowhead whales in the western Beaufort and far northeastern Chukchi seas," Deep-Sea Res. II, 57, 153-157, doi:10.1016/j.dsr2.2009.08.013, 2010.

More Info

1 Jan 2010

Two types of passive-acoustic survey were conducted to investigate the seasonal occurrence of bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus) in the western Beaufort and far northeastern Chukchi seas: (1) an over-winter (2003–04) survey using autonomous recorders deployed northeast of Barrow, Alaska, and (2) a summertime dipping-hydrophone survey along the 2005 NOAA Ocean Exploration (OE) cruise track northwest of Barrow. The longest continuous sampling period from the over-winter survey was 3 October 2003 to 12 May 2004. During that period, bowhead whale calls were recorded from 3 to 23 October, intermittently on 6–7 and 22–23 November, then not again until 25 March 2004. Bowhead calls were recorded almost every hour from 19 April to 12 May 2004, with a call rate peak on 30 April (ca. 9400 calls) and a few instances of patterned calling (or, "song") detected in early May. Bowhead whale calls were never detected during the NOAA OE cruise, but calls of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) were recorded at 3 of 16 acoustic stations. Opportunistic visual surveys for marine mammals were also conducted during the NOAA OE cruise from the ship (65 h) and helicopter (7.8 h), resulting in single sightings of bowhead whales (3–5 whales), beluga (16–20 whales), walrus (1), polar bear (2=sow/cub), and 17 sightings of 87 ringed seals from the ship and 15 sightings of 67 ringed seals from the helicopter.

Acoustic sampling for marine mammals in the Beaufort Sea July 2007-March 2008

Stafford, K., S. Moore, C. Berchok, and D.K. Mellinger, "Acoustic sampling for marine mammals in the Beaufort Sea July 2007-March 2008," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 125, 2587, 2009.

More Info

1 Apr 2009

As climate change is driving rapid, unprecedented warming of the Arctic, there is increasing interest in how such change will impact Arctic marine mammals. Impacts are anticipated from habitat alteration, including increasing ambient noise levels from shipping, seismic exploration for oil and gas and geophysical research, and (potentially) commercial fishing. In order to monitor natural and anthropogenic sources of noise, four autonomous recorders were deployed along the 100-m isobath between Cape Halkett and Barrow and recorded data from July 2007–March 2008. The instruments sampled at 8192 Hz on a schedule of 10 min on, 20 min off.

Marine mammal sounds recorded included pinnipeds (walrus and bearded seals) and cetaceans (bowhead and beluga whales), while anthropogenic sources included shipping and air gun sounds. Seasonal and geographic patterns for these sounds will be presented. These data form part of a broader-scale international, year-round monitoring program in the Arctic that we hope will eventually span the entire Arctic and provide a basin-wide acoustic observatory.

Environmental correlates of blue and fin whale call detections in the North Pacific Ocean from 1997 to 2002

Stafford, K.M., J.J. Citta, S.E. Moore, M.A. Daher, and J.E. George, "Environmental correlates of blue and fin whale call detections in the North Pacific Ocean from 1997 to 2002," Mar. Ecol. Prog. Series, 395, 37-53, doi:10.3354/meps08362, 2009.

More Info

1 Jan 2009

A 6 yr time series of blue whale Balaenoptera musculus and fin whale B. physalus call detections in the North Pacific Ocean was correlated with 3 oceanographic variables (sea-surface temperature, chlorophyll a concentration, and mixed layer depth), to investigate the broad-scale calling behavior of these species. Monthly values for satellite-derived oceanographic data and whale call data were compared for 4 regions (30° longitude by 15° of latitude) encompassing the whole subarctic North Pacific and an area in the temperate northeastern Pacific.

To determine predictive models for whale call occurrence, generalized linear models were used to determine which, if any, oceanographic variables might influence whale calling behavior over such broad space and time scales. Sea-surface temperature was the best oceanographic variable for predicting whale call detections for both species and all regions.

Bowhead whale springtime song off West Greenland

Stafford, K.M., S.E. Moore, K.L. Laidre, and M.P. Heide-Jorgensen, "Bowhead whale springtime song off West Greenland," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 124, 1-9, doi:10.1121/1.2980443, 2008.

More Info

1 Nov 2008

Three songs were recorded from bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus) in Disko Bay, West Greenland, during 59 h of recordings via sonobuoys deployed on seven days between 5 and 14 April 2007. Song elements were defined by units following the protocol of previous description of bowhead whale song. The two most prominent songs were loud, complex, and repeated in long bouts on multiple recording days while the third song was much simpler and recorded on only one day.

Bowhead whale simple calls and faint song elements were also recorded using digital audio tape recorders and a dipping hydrophone deployed from the sea ice approximately 100–150 km southwest of Disko Bay on three separate days suggesting that song is also produced in the central portion of Baffin Bay in winter. Songs recorded in Disko Bay are from an area where approximately 85% of the whales have been determined to be adult females. Although it is not known which sex was singing, we speculate that, as in humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), male bowhead whales may sing to mediate sexual competition or mate selection behaviors. This is the first detailed description of springtime songs for bowhead whales in the eastern Arctic.

An overview of fixed passive acoustic observation methods for cetaceans

Mellinger, D.K., K.M. Stafford, S.E. Moore, R.P. Dziak, and H. Matsumoto, "An overview of fixed passive acoustic observation methods for cetaceans," Oceanography, 20, 36-45, 2007.

More Info

1 Dec 2007

Cetaceans are increasingly being included as top trophic-level predators in models of ecosystem dynamics (Baumgartner and Mate, 2003; Tynan, 2004; Redfern et al., 2006). Traditional visual survey methods for cetaceans detect only a fraction of the animals present, both because visual observers can see them only during the very short period when they are at the surface, and because visual surveys can be undertaken only during daylight hours in relatively good weather (Mellinger and Barlow, 2003). Perhaps more importantly, visual survey results can be highly variable, due both to clumping of cetaceans into large groups and to their relatively limited spatial and temporal scales. Surveys are typically performed using a small number of observation points—one or a few vessels—for a few weeks to a few months of the year.

Including whale call detection in standard ocean measurements: Application of acoustic Seagliders

Moore, S.E., B.M. Howe, K.M. Stafford, and M.L. Boyd, "Including whale call detection in standard ocean measurements: Application of acoustic Seagliders," Mar. Tech. Soc. J., 41, 49-53, doi:10.4031/002533207787442033, 2007.

More Info

1 Dec 2007

Over the past decade, fixed recorders have come into increasing use for long-term sampling of whale calls in remote ocean regions. Concurrently, the development of several types of autonomous underwater vehicles has demonstrated measurement capabilities that promise to revolutionize ocean science. These two lines of technical development were merged with the addition of broadband (5 Hz to 30 kHz) omni-directional hydrophones to seagliders. In August 2006, the capability of three Acoustic Seagliders (ASGs) to detect whale calls was tested in an experiment offshore Monterey, California. In total, 401 dives were completed and over 107 hours of acoustic data recorded. Blue whale calls were detected on all but two of the 76 dives where acoustic data were analyzed in detail, while humpback and sperm whale calls were detected on roughly 20% of those dives. Various whistles, clicks and burst calls, similar to those produced by dolphins and small whales, were also detected, suggesting that the capability of ASGs can be expanded to sample a broad range of marine mammal species. The potential to include whale call detection in the suite of standard oceanographic measures is unprecedented and provides a foundation for mobile sampling strategies at scales that better match the vertical and horizontal movements of the whales themselves. This capability opens new doors for investigation of cetacean habitats and their role in marine ecosystems, as envisioned in future ocean observing systems.

Seasonal variability and detection range modeling of baleen whale calls in the Gulf of Alaska, 1999-2002

Stafford, K.M., D.K. Mellinger, S.E. Moore, and C.G. Fox, "Seasonal variability and detection range modeling of baleen whale calls in the Gulf of Alaska, 1999-2002," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 122, 3378-3390, doi:10.1121/1.2799905, 2007.

More Info

1 Dec 2007

Five species of large whales, including the blue (Balaenoptera musculus), fin (B. physalus), sei (B. borealis), humpback (Megaptera novaeangliae), and North Pacific right (Eubalaena japonica), were the target of commercial harvests in the Gulf of Alaska (GoA) during the 19th through mid-20th centuries. Since this time, there have been a few summer time visual surveys for these species, but no overview of year-round use of these waters by endangered whales primarily because standard visual survey data are difficult and costly.

From October 1999–May 2002, moored hydrophones were deployed in six locations in the GoA to record whale calls. Reception of calls from fin, humpback, and blue whales and an unknown source, called Watkins' whale, showed seasonal and geographic variation. Calls were detected more often during the winter than during the summer, suggesting that animals inhabit the GoA year-round. To estimate the distance at which species-diagnostic calls could be heard, parabolic equation propagation loss models for frequencies characteristic of each of each call type were run. Maximum detection ranges in the subarctic North Pacific ranged from 45 to 250 km among three species (fin, humpback, blue), although modeled detection ranges varied greatly with input parameters and choice of ambient noise level.

Gray whale calls recorded near Barrow, Alaska, throughout the winter of 2003-04

Stafford, K.M., S.E. Moore, M. Spillane, and S. Wiggins, "Gray whale calls recorded near Barrow, Alaska, throughout the winter of 2003-04," Arctic, 60, 167-172, 2007.

More Info

1 Jun 2007

Since the mid-1990s, gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) have been reported with increasing frequency near Barrow, Alaska, during summer and autumn months. In collaboration with a broad-scale oceanographic study, three autonomous acoustic recorders were moored northeast of Barrow in October 2003 to provide capability for year-round detection of calls. Two recorders were recovered in September 2004, one from the continental slope (water depth = 316 m) and one from near the base of the slope (water depth = 1258 m). The shallow instrument recorded for roughly 3 months (87 days), and the deeper instrument for roughly 7.3 months (222 days). Gray whale calls were recorded on both instruments throughout their periods of operation. The calling rate at the shallower instrument was higher than at the deeper recorder, but surprisingly, the deeper instrument detected calls throughout the 2003–04 winter, though the calling rate diminished as winter progressed. Low-frequency N1/S1 pulses, the most common of the calls produced by gray whales, were recorded from deployment through December 2003 on the shallower of the two instruments and from deployment through May 2004 on the deeper instrument. Because this is the first-ever winterlong acoustic study, we cannot be certain that gray whales have not overwintered in the Beaufort Sea in the past. However, a combination of increasing population size and habitat alteration associated with sea ice reduction and warming in the Alaskan Arctic may be responsible for the extra-seasonal gray whale occurrence near Barrow.

Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) sightings and recordings south of the Aleutian Islands

Rankin, S., J. Barlow, and K.M. Stafford, "Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) sightings and recordings south of the Aleutian Islands," Mar. Mammal Sci., 22, 708-713, doi:10.1111/j.1748-7692.2006.00054.x, 2006.

1 Jul 2006

Listening for large whales in the offshore waters of Alaska

Moore, S.E., K.M. Stafford, D.K. Mellinger, and J.A. Hildebrand, "Listening for large whales in the offshore waters of Alaska," Bioscience, 56, 49-55, 2006.

More Info

1 Jan 2006

In 1999, the first phase of a multiyear program was initiated at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Marine Mammal Laboratory and Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory to advance the use of passive acoustics for the detection and assessment of large whales in offshore Alaskan waters. To date, autonomous recorders have been successfully deployed in the Gulf of Alaska (1999–2001), the southeastern Bering Sea (2000–present), and the western Beaufort Sea (2003–2004). Seasonal occurrences of six endangered species (blue, fin, humpback, North Pacific right, bowhead, and sperm whales) have been documented on the basis of call receptions in these remote ocean regions. In addition, eastern North Pacific gray whale calls were detected in the western Beaufort Sea from October 2003 through May 2004. Here we provide an overview of this suite of research projects and suggest the next steps for applying acoustic data from long-term recorders to the assessment of large whale populations.

Atypical calling by a blue whale in the Gulf of Alaska

Stafford, K.M., and S.E. Moore, "Atypical calling by a blue whale in the Gulf of Alaska," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 117, 2724-2727, 2005

More Info

1 May 2005

Worldwide, calls from blue whales share the characteristics of being long (>20 s), low-frequency (<100 Hz) signals that often exhibit amplitude and frequency modulation. Despite sharing these basic features, the calls of blue whales recorded in different ocean basins are distinct from one another, leading to the suggestion that populations and/or subspecies may be identified based on call characteristics. An example of anomalous calling behavior by a blue whale in the Gulf of Alaska is reported that may complicate this approach, and that suggests that blue whales can mimic each other's calls.

Diel variation in blue whale calls recorded in the eastern tropical Pacific

Stafford, K.M., S.E. Moore, and C.G. Fox, "Diel variation in blue whale calls recorded in the eastern tropical Pacific," Animal Behaviour, 69, 951-958, doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2004.06.025, 2005.

2 Jan 2005

In The News

Mystery of bowhead whale song

Everett Herald, Sharon Wootton

Oceanographer Kate Stafford of the University of Washington%u2019s Applied Physics Laboratory, is researching the sounds of bowhead whales in Fram Strait off the coast of Greenland. Based on the song diversity, loudness and period over which the songs were recorded, western Fram Strait appears to be a wintering ground and potentially a mating area, as well.

16 Mar 2014

Whales, ships more common through Bering Strait

UW News and Information, Hannah Hickey

The Arctic is home to a growing number of whales and ships, and to populations of sub-Arctic whales that are expanding their territory into newly ice-free Arctic waters.

26 Feb 2014

Scientists look to marine mammals to shed light on Arctic ice loss

Minnesota Public Radio, Kerri Miller

University of Washington marine mammal ecologist Kristin Laidre and Kate Stafford, principal oceanographer at the Applied Physics Laboratory at Washington University, are using their studies of Arctic mammals to unlock some of the mysteries of ice loss. Kerri Miller held a conversation with the two scientists at the World Science Festival.

4 Jun 2013

More News Items

Acoustics Air-Sea Interaction & Remote Sensing Center for Environmental & Information Systems Center for Industrial & Medical Ultrasound Electronic & Photonic Systems Ocean Engineering Ocean Physics Polar Science Center
Close

 

Close

 

Close