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Jie Yang

Senior Physicist

Email

jieyang@apl.washington.edu

Phone

206-685-7617

Department Affiliation

Acoustics

Publications

2000-present and while at APL-UW

A normal mode reverberation and target echo model to interpret towed array data in the target and reverberation experiments

Ellis, D.D., J. Yang, J.R. Preston, and S. Pecknold, "A normal mode reverberation and target echo model to interpret towed array data in the target and reverberation experiments," IEEE J. Ocean. Eng., 42, 344-361, doi:10.1109/JOE.2017.2674106, 2017.

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1 Apr 2017

Reverberation measurements obtained with towed arrays are a valuable tool to extract information about the ocean environment. By superimposing a polar plot of reverberation beam time series on bathymetry maps, bottom features (often uncharted) can be located. As part of Rapid Environmental Assessment exercises, Preston and Ellis used directional reverberation measurements to extract environmental information using model-data comparisons. This early work used range-independent (flat bottom) ray-based models for the model-data comparisons, while current work includes range-dependent models based on adiabatic normal modes. Here, we discuss a range-dependent shallow-water reverberation model using adiabatic normal modes that has been developed to handle bottom scattering and clutter echoes in a range-dependent environment. Beam time series similar to those measured on a horizontal line array can be produced. Comparisons can then directly be made with data, features identified, and estimates of the scattering obtained. Of particular interest will be data obtained on the triplet line array during the 2013 Target and Reverberation EXperiments in the Gulf of Mexico off Panama City, FL, USA, where interesting effects in sea bottom sand dunes were observed. Particular attention has been paid to calibration to get estimates of scattering strengths. In addition to the reverberation, a preliminary investigation of the target echo is presented.

Rainfall measurements in the North Atlantic Ocean using underwater ambient sound

Yang, J., W.E. Asher, and S.C. Riser, "Rainfall measurements in the North Atlantic Ocean using underwater ambient sound," Proc., IEEE/OES China Ocean Acoustics Symposium, 9-11 January, Harbin, China (IEEE/OES, 2016).

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8 Aug 2016

Quantification of rainfall over the ocean is critical in understanding the global hydrological cycle. However, oceanic rain has proven difficult to measure due to problems associated with platform motion and flow distortion combined with the spatial and temporal variability of rainfall itself. Passive acoustic rain gauges avoid these issues by using the underwater sound generated by raindrops on the ocean surface to detect and quantify rainfall. In this paper, the operating principles for and data from the Passive Aquatic Listener (PAL), which uses underwater ambient sound to measure rainfall rate and wind speed, are presented. PAL was incorporated onto thirteen Argo profilers that were deployed in September, 2012 as part of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration-sponsored Salinity Processes in the Upper ocean Regional Studies (NASA SPURS) field experiment in the North Atlantic Ocean. PAL-Argo was initially deployed within a 200 km x 200 km box, PAL-Argos now cover a 1600-km x 600-km region, and continue to telemeter rain rate and wind speed data. Comparisons of these PAL data with in situ and satellite measurements show good agreement for both rain rate and wind speed. Seasonal and inter-annual variability of wind and rain fields in the region are also presented.

Regional rainfall measurements using the passive aquatic listener during the SPURS field campaign

Yang, J., S.C. Riser, J.A. Nystuen, W.E. Asher, and A.T. Jessup, "Regional rainfall measurements using the passive aquatic listener during the SPURS field campaign," Oceanography, 28, 124-133, doi:10.5670/oceanog.2015.10, 2015.

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1 Mar 2015

Knowledge of the intensity and spatial-temporal distribution of rainfall over the ocean is critical in understanding the global hydrological cycle. However, rain has proven difficult to measure over the ocean due to problems associated with platform motion and flow distortion combined with the spatial and temporal variability of rainfall itself. Underwater acoustical rain gauges avoid these issues by using the loud and distinctive underwater sound generated by raindrops on the ocean surface to detect and quantify rainfall. Here, the physics and operation of and results from an instrument that uses underwater ambient sound to measure rainfall rate and wind speed are presented. Passive Aquatic Listener (PAL) instruments were mounted on a buoy deployed at Ocean Station P and on 13 Argo profilers that were deployed as part of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration-sponsored Salinity Processes in the Upper-ocean Regional Study (SPURS) field experiment in the North Atlantic Ocean. The PALs provide near-continuous measurements of rain rate and wind speed during the two-year period over the SPURS study region defined by the Argo profilers. Comparisons of PAL data with rain and wind measured by other techniques, including direct in situ observations and satellite measurements, show good agreement for both rain rate and wind speed.

More Publications

Acoustics Air-Sea Interaction & Remote Sensing Center for Environmental & Information Systems Center for Industrial & Medical Ultrasound Electronic & Photonic Systems Ocean Engineering Ocean Physics Polar Science Center
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